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What should I do if my PC keep dying with a Blue Screen of Death?

What's worse than the sudden, unexpected appearance of a blue screen filled with white text? Recurring appearances of blue screens filled with white text. The fewer times you have to read the maddeningly passive-voice observation "A problem has been detected and Windows has been shut down...," the better.
Microsoft calls these freeze-frame moments "stop errors," but everyone else uses a much more descriptive title: The Blue Screen of Death (BSoD). They occur whenever Windows senses a problem that won't let it operate properly.

When you encounter a BSoD, there's not much you can do except mourn your lost data (whatever was in memory but not yet saved to disk), reboot your machine, and go on with your life. If you start getting them regularly, however, you have a problem that must be addressed.

The question is, what's causing the problem?

 

|Date: 2008-08-10 visits: 2818| comments  0 Read more

How to use a hard drive on both a PC and a Mac

Moving your files from a PC to a Mac? You may find that the job isn't quite so simple, because Macs, out of the box, can't read drives formatted with the NTFS file system, which is the standard for Windows. How do you solve the dilemma of getting hundreds of gigs of data from your Windows PC to your Mac?

While a variety of solutions are possible, the best I've found is to use a simple piece of software called MacFuse. MacFuse is a small and very simple piece of software that lets Macs read NTFS drives (and, in fact, drives formatted with a variety of file systems).

|Date: 2008-07-02 visits: 2914| comments  0 Read more

Setting Up Shared Printers for a Home Network

A terrific side effect of installing a computer network in your home is the ability to share a printer. Households without networks face some difficulties when it comes to printing. Network-deficient households have to rely on some less-than-perfect solutions.

If you want all the computers on your network to be able to access a single printer, you have to set up the Windows printer-sharing feature. Then you have to set up the printer for sharing. You perform these tasks at the computer to which the printer is connected.

The most difficult part of setting up network printing is deciding which computer gets the printer. Here are some common guidelines you can follow:

Location. If you have room for a table at one computer location (and storage space for paper), that's the computer to choose.

Usage patterns. If one computer on the network is used far more often than any other computer, that's the computer to select.

Some households have more than one printer. You may have a black-and-white printer as well as a color printer. When you enable printer sharing, each user can choose a printer every time he or she wants to print.

Some households have more than one printer. You may have a black-and-white printer as well as a color printer. When you enable printer sharing, each user can choose a printer every time he or she wants to print.

|Date: 2008-06-19 visits: 2887| comments  0 Read more